IR Photos – Take Two

In my last post I described Infrared photography, likely causing eyes to glaze over and spontaneous naps to ensue with my not so technical audience. This time around, I’ll just stick to IR pictures and keep the commentary to a minimum. I hope you find them interesting.

Albino Artichoke
A scalped Maple waiting to turn over a new leaf – or maybe a few hundred.
Lenses are even more susceptible to lens flare in Infrared than in visible light.
Rosemary in a sunbeam
This tree should take on a whole different look this summer, when it’s buried in leaves. They’ll all reflect IR light like crazy, turning the tree into a giant mushroom shape.
Lace Leaf Maple
False Color, big drink of water

44 thoughts on “IR Photos – Take Two

    1. The water tower is one of the few previsualized shots in this set. Most were just walking along shots. Do you like this shot for the colors or the content? Since colors are false, I’m never quite sure where to go with it. Painting was never a skill.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Gay Julian

    Beautiful pictures Dave. I have to say your basic explanations still went over my head a bit. I like the artichoke having a turn at being special it looks really good. I also have a weakness for Japanese maples and the delicate wispiness of their leaves shows up here.
    Hope all is well with you both over there.

    Like

    1. Hi Gay. I’ve always thought artichoke plants looked cool. It just so happens they reflect a lot of IR light, making for an interesting B/W picture, especially with the dappled shadows. I like Japanese Maples too. We have a good sized one in the front yard. Good sized now anyway, it was just a little guy when I moved in 30 years ago.

      We’re doing well here, and looking forward to things opening up more. Not quite there just yet. I hope all is well in Oz.

      Like

    1. Thanks, Peter. Of course, this is just one interpretation, and the only reason there are any colors at all is my IR conversion lets visible oranges/reds through along with the IR and I switch them around.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Interesting that that one caught your attention. That tree was the reason I walked to that park in the first place, along with seeing how my wide-angle lens would react. Lots of lenses don’t do well for IR, as their lens and barrel coatings were never designed for it. Many of them get a “hot spot” in the middle of the shot, but I haven’t had too much trouble with that just yet. That wide-angle likes to flare in visible light too, it’s just more pronounced in IR.

      Come summer I’ll revisit that tree. It gets very lush and leafy and should glow like a moonlit night.

      Like

    1. As I was telling an earlier commenter, it’s my secret way to enjoy snowscapes without freezing my buns off. 😉 If you’re interested in seeing more IR, there’s a pretty good Facebook group that’ll show more effects. (You don’t have to join the group to lurk.) A lot of those guys use 720nm IR filters; those cut out all the visible orange and most of the visible red that I get with my 590nm, so it’s nearly pure IR.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Nice collection, Dave. And also a good prod for me to have my now idle 5DII converted. I’ve made a few images using an IR filter but they are difficult to compose with and a converted camera seems more sensible and easier to use.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, a converted camera is easier to work with. And your 5DII is a much better camera than my D5000 and would likely be easier to use. (The LCD on the D5000 is pathetic, I can’t really use it to manually focus. LCD autofocus all the way.) Kolari Vision on your side of the country and Life Pixel on my side both do good jobs on conversions, and both websites give good info on considerations for choosing conversion filters, etc.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Very strange in a good way. For some reason, these IR photos often make things look not just wintry, but absolutely still. I suppose that’s just my mind telling me everything is frozen. Really enjoy the surreal feeling. In the 8th shot, the tree that you anticipate will resemble a mushroom once it has leaves, it looks like the branches have snagged some passing clouds. Very cool stuff!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hadn’t thought about it, but you’re right about that stillness thing. Even the shots without the desaturated colors have a frozen in time look. I’ve noticed that on other folks IR shots too.

      Like

  4. So lovely Dave they made me think of snowscapes and fresh snowfall.. I like the surreal quality and that you made me look a few times, enjoying the creative aspect of these images and taking a fresh look from this different perspective .

    Peta

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is a bit surreal, isn’t it? But as I mentioned in the last post, how do you show something you can’t see? What color do you assign something that has no color? Whatever looks good, I guess.

      Like

  5. I like these in the way I like black and white photos, because they draw attention to the form of things and the relationship between them which colour shots can obscure. Something to do with seeing in 3D, I suppose?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There’s some truth to that. The weird thing is, I’m kind of getting used to some of the nonstandard color combinations. Still, like B/W, it forces you to look at the world in a different way. Maybe everyone should try something like that.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. The high IR reflectiveness of chlorophyll bearing plants makes for interesting effects, doesn’t it? Since that doesn’t have an “official” color, white seems to be a less bizarre option than some of the others.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s