Lansing

We found ourselves among ponds, strewn with cattails, broadleaf arrowhead, and lilypads. Songs of birds with a bass line of bullfrogs filled the air. Ducks paddled about, and monopolized the walking paths.

The Wetlands

DSC_3912.JPG

DSC_3905.JPG

DSC_3910.JPG

The Tollgate wetlands are a quiet backwater, little known even among the residents of Lansing. They’re not large, about 12 acres or roughly 5 city blocks, with a path around the perimeter. Our hosts tell us they are man-made, and have a cascading group of ponds designed to offer the benefits of a wetland and to act as a filtration system for water runoff.

DSC_3906.JPG

DSC_3913.JPG

Perhaps these marshes contribute to a phenomenon I hadn’t seen since I was a kid – fireflies! While on an evening stroll through a Lansing neighborhood we were treated to a show; periodic flashes of light randomly appearing in mid-air as if by magic, then after a brief streak disappearing again until the next magical moment. Fireflies are actually winged beetles, and are often found near wetlands.

The Museum

But Lansing is much more than a quiet backwater. It is a city of importance, both culturally and politically.

Perhaps I should back up. Some of you may recall a recent post describing the grueling rigors of a cross-country trip. That story left us in western Wisconsin, visiting with family and enjoying a nephew’s wedding. But that was just part one of the trip.

Part two begin with a 500 mile drive, from deep in the green countryside of Wisconsin farmland, across the state into Illinois for the joys and perils of Chicago’s traffic and [insert rude adjective here] toll roads, then northeast across the tip of Indiana and into Michigan, following along Lake Michigan then inland to the city of Lansing.

We were there to visit with my wife’s sister and her husband. My wife had been there on several occasions, but it was my first trip.

Lansing, in addition to harboring the breeding grounds for a duck dynasty, is also a center of government – it houses the state capital. Depending on who you talk to, this might imply at least half of those in power are a bunch of quacks.

I jest. Being a government center has its benefits, one of which is housing the Michigan History Center. This museum runs the gamut from prehistory (alas, the mastodon exhibit was missing due to construction) to the Viet Nam era.

DSC_3916.JPG
Civil War Era Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded to George Sidman for his actions at the Battle of Gaines Mill in 1862

The museum included exhibits on the settlement of Michigan, the Civil War era, a 1920’s street scene, WW II, the automotive scene going from the Model T days to the 60’s, Motown, and much more.

DSC_3929.JPG
WW II
DSC_3925.JPG
Model T Ford
Produced 1908–1927
DSC_3938.JPG
First Generation Chevrolet Corvette
Late 50’s – Early 60’s
DSC_3933
Motown Rocker

Side note: on occasion, my wife and I watch a show on the Travel Channel called Mysteries At The Museum. Since the trip, we’ve seen artifacts from the Michigan History museum featured in two episodes.

The Capital

DSC_3892.JPG
Stairway to Where?

How many of you have visited your state capital? Those with 20-20 virtual eyesight will note my hand is not raised for Oregon, but now I can say I’ve seen Minnesota’s (field trip when I was a kid) and Michigan’s. The legislature was not in session so I could not verify the myth that quacks don’t echo in a large chamber (yes, I know, that jest grows weary), but I could admire the architecture, and especially the dome.

DSC_3880.JPG

DSC_3890.JPG

And now it comes time to travel again. Stare long and deep into the circles, click your heels together three times and consider…
DSC_3879.JPG

There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man’s fears, and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call – The Twilight Zone. — Rod Serling

Oops. That’s a whole different trip…

Advertisements

32 thoughts on “Lansing

  1. pinklightsabre

    Liked the Motown Rocker photo…man, I miss fireflies (or lightning bugs, though I think they’re different species) from my time growing up on the east coast. I think fireflies are more orange whereas the lightning bugs I remember were like a yellow/green color. Didn’t know they’re beetles. I haven’t been to Olympia, at least to the capitol building there so no, no points there for me on state capitols.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The in-laws ran their kids through MSU as well, and we drove around the campus while we were there. I suspect I’d prefer Colorado over the midwest myself, I’m still glad I escaped Minnesota winters.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I remember spending many a fun summer night chasing and catching fireflies. (We also called them lightening bugs.) But you’re right, we don’t see them much anymore, which is sad. Thanks for sharing your trip to Lansing! I helped chaperone both of my kid’s class trip to our state capital, and it was really very interesting. Gotta watch out for those “quacks,” though. We have them, too!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I miss fireflies so much! When I took a road trip 3/4 of the way across the country in 2011, I spent many an evening standing outside after dark, mesmerized by them, even though I was getting eaten alive by mosquitoes. Sure wish we had them out this way!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I love the Corvette and the mallard ducks! I’ve never visited the area, never been to America and as a person mostly housebound these days, I won’t be travelling anymore.
    Will look at some more of your posts later, but I like what I’ve seen, so far. Shall visit occasionally. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’ve only occasionally seen fireflies in my life, but it’s always been a bit of a thrill when I have. Lancing sounds like a nice place to visit. I liked the look of the museum too. Incidentally, you make a great Motown rocker.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Rosemary

    I went to MSU in E. Lansing. It is entertaining to see my home state through your eyes Dave. Great shots of the dome-it has been many years since I last saw it. Proud to say I have been to the Washington capitol building on several occasions-to lobby and protest!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We cruised through the MSU campus while we were there, the in-law’s live pretty close and both their kids are graduates. I guess there was something about the Lansing story that struck a chord, it’s been more popular than any of the Peru stories. Easier to relate I guess.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s